Working Culture

A philosophical/political movement whose members feared the human decadence of a society in which all basic needs were met. Members tended to believe that necessary work, i.e. earning essential life-sustaining rewards such as food and shelter, was at the core of what it meant to be human. There was controversy over whether or not they had much more than anecdotal data to support their views, but regardless of their validity, they had a loyal following.

Working Culture slowed the progress of the Utopians and put legal limits on the amount of “change” that could be made in a given amount of time. Of these limits, the most significant was a law against producing replicators, which was put in place at a time when it was hard to imagine the technology being possible and was therefore not heavily fought by the Utopians. Some historians believe that one or more research labs may have been working on a replicator, or at least its components, which could have led to the final conflict between Working Culture and the Utopians.

After Working Culture defeated the Utopians, the group’s solidarity faded as deferred internal disagreements became the new focus for their armed followers, and this soon devolved into a civil war which, while relatively short in span, was an enormous setback to humanity. Working Culture had created an outcome that was the polar opposite of the goal of the Utopians, but the philosophy was rejected by those who had lived in the society created by the Utopians and had to compare it with a life of constant struggle.

Working Culture

Council's Table Human